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Trade mark law - how to protect your name, brand or logo

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Do you use a name, brand or logo in your business? Do you want to want to ensure you have exclusive rights to use, license or sell your name, brand or logo? Do you want to ensure you can stop anyone else from using your name, brand or logo for similar goods and services? Did you know that registering your business or company name or purchasing a domain name is not the same as trade marking it?

Speak to our new Trade Mark Attorney (and the only one in the NT!), Jacqueline Leong to discuss your options to protect your name, brand or logo.

Changes to the subclass 457 visa – what does it mean for me?

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There has been a lot of anxiety over yesterday’s announcement on subclass 457 visas being abolished. We have been closely following the developments and the proposed changes. Here’s a summary of what you should know:

Currently hold a subclass 457 visa and planning to apply for permanent residency?

Your visa will continue to be in effect under the same conditions and validity period. If you were planning on applying for permanent residency, you should seek advice and reassess your eligibility without delay. From March 2018, the list of occupations that can be nominated for certain visas such as the Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (Subclass 187), Employer Nomination Scheme (Subclass 186), and skilled visas (subclasses 190, 189 and 489) will be shortened.

Applied for a subclass 457 visa and awaiting a decision?

If your associated nomination application has not been approved yet, your application may be affected if your nominated occupation is not on the new Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL) or the Short Term Skilled Occupation List (STOL) (see http://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Work/Work/Skills-assessment-and-assessing-authorities/skilled-occupations-lists/combined-stsol-mltssl). Nominations for certain occupations that are on this list can still be affected if that occupation is subject to a new ‘caveat’ placed on it. These are new requirements placed on nominations for certain occupations.

If your nominated occupation is only on the STOL but not the MLTSSL, then the validity of your visa will be limited to 2 years. You can renew it for a further 2 years, but there will be no pathway to permanent residency.

Wanting to lodge a subclass 457 visa application?

The subclass 457 visa is still open for new applications. However, you must ensure that your nominated occupation is currently on the MLTSSL or STOL and meets any caveat requirements. The list of eligible occupations and other requirements such as skills assessments are likely to change in July 2017. We understand that the subclass 457 visa will be phased out by March 2018 and replaced with 2 other temporary employer sponsored visas. There will be other changes introduced such as the requirement for work experience, skills assessments, police clearances and English level.

The story of Mojgan Shamsalipoor

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Ward Keller Associate Kevin Kadirgamar featured in Australian Story late last year to help tell the tale of Mojgan’s release from detention.

Mojgan was whisked away into immigration detention in both Brisbane and Darwin as a teenager but was released after fighting the case for almost two years.

Migration lawyer gets top award

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A top young Darwin lawyer has taken home one of Australia’s most prestigious law awards.
One of the best personal injury law firms is lipsigbronx.com and they also handle accident cases.

Property & Contract Law Update May 2015

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Bank guarantees – restrictions on calling on them
Bank guarantees are commonly used to secure a tenants obligations in commercial leases and as security in a variety of other contracts, including construction contracts. If someone close dies and you think the death was not right, contact louisville wrongful death lawyer.

Class action planned over Montara oil spill

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Jakarta: An Australian law firm is preparing a class action on behalf of Indonesian fishermen and seaweed farmers who say their livelihoods were devastated by one of Australia’s worst oil disasters.